Category Archives: Alcohol Addiction

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Time for Back To School. Did Your Child Become Addicted to Drugs Over the Summer?

After several months of summer vacation, the time has come for your child to go back to school. It can be difficult for most children to get back into the swing of things and the routine that school entails. Waking up early, going school all day long, attending extracurricular activities, and completing homework can be very taxing. This is why it is so important for your child to be performing at his or her peak. Their performance can be greatly hindered if they become addicted to drugs.

Summertime comes with freedom and lots of peer interaction outside of adult supervision. Along with that comes peer pressure to fit in, which may include using drugs and alcohol. Drug addiction can even severely affect a child’s future potential. It is important to address the issue as soon as possible, but how can you tell and what can you do about it?

Signs of Drug Use & What You Can Do About It

Before you can address your child’s drug addiction, you must first notice it. Many parents misattribute drug use to a child being in a “phase” or simply being a “teenager”. While that is understandable, there are several signs of drug use that stand apart from average teenager behavior:

  • Depression or overexcitement
  • Sunken in face and bloodshot eyes
  • Constantly asks for money for various “needs”,specifically cash
  • Leaving at unusual times of the night and appearing generally suspicious

Once you recognize these or similar behaviors in your child, you must act quickly.

First, talk to your child. While many children will be avoidant or lie to you about their drug use, not all will. It is possible that they are depressed, hurting, and know what they are doing is wrong, but want your help. They may just admit it and even ask for help. If they do not, it is time to make them understand that you will not accept a drug addict living in your home.

In both cases, it is vital to get them into a treatment center ASAP. Neither you or your child are equipped with the proper tools to cure your child of drug addiction.

To get help now, call 855-782-1009

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I Have a Job And I Pay My Bills. Why Are They Saying I Need Treatment for Drinking?

When you are a self-sufficient and fully functioning member of society, it is difficult to hear people continually suggest that you seek help for drinking. It feels as though people are focusing on one small part of your lifestyle, while ignoring all the other wonderful parts of who you are. This article is written with the intention of helping you understand your loved one’s concerns in a way that they do not have the ability to communicate.

It is not that your loved ones question your integrity. Rather, they value your integrity and want to see you maintain it for a lifetime. Drinking alcohol is not so much a right as it is a privilege. The line between functional and impaired drinking is thin, and most of us cannot see from our own perspective that we have begun to cross it. Your loved ones admire you for your ability to care for yourself and maintain a career. Their biggest fear is that something will ruin that for you, and they have noticed something that has awakened that fear.

Alcohol is a deadly weapon. It is easy to reason that it does not matter how much we drink, as long as we can still function. However, the ability with which we function after consuming alcohol does not negate the deleterious effects it has on our physiological health, especially the brain cells it kills and the stress it puts on the liver. In fact, the more you can drink without it affecting your daily routine, the more likely it is that you have build up a tolerance to a physiologically dangerous amount of alcohol. The more tolerant your body is to alcohol, the more it takes to maintain equilibrium, and the worse your symptoms of withdrawal will be when you try to decrease the amount. This also increases the percentage of your income you need to put towards alcohol.

Where to Go From Here

Now that you better understand the concerns of your loved ones, it is important for you to educate yourself and form your own opinion about the harmful effects of your relationship with alcohol. Getting treatment is a challenging but powerfully rewarding experience when you take control of it yourself. Our counselors are always available to help you take the first step, just call 855-782-1009

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Why No Addiction Treatment Centers Will Take Your Health Insurance

A health insurance customer who has drug addiction coverage is lucky indeed. Many health insurance companies do not cover addiction treatment. The people who decide what health insurance policies cover believe that addiction is an easily avoidable disease. Medical science supports this opinion slightly. Genetic studies have shown that some people are predisposed to addiction to certain substances. Having these genes does not guarantee someone will become an addict. It just means that if they try the substance which they are predisposed to become addicted to, they are more likely to be unable to stop.

Insurance companies are about taking risks. Their business model relies on gambling. Someone who is healthy may experience low premiums. A person who becomes unhealthy may find his premiums go up until his insurance company drops him. Before the affordable care act passed, insurance companies could refuse to cover someone if they had a pre-existing condition. Many people fear that if the Republicans manage to repeal the Affordable Care Act, the pre-existing condition coverage will be stripped.

Insurance companies will find anyway they can to get out of paying a claim or to get out of providing coverage to a risky group. A patient who goes into drug rehab is likely to need a lot of expensive medical care. The detox process is dangerous and risky. It must be done in a hospital under medical supervision. For some drugs, it is not safe to just quit cold turkey. Alcohol and opiates fall into this category.

The companies prefer to cover only the low-cost services patients are most likely to need. Preventative care services are covered a lot, since the directors believe this will lower theire overall business costs. Trying to cover something expensive, like cancer, is something they do grudgingly. They usually only do it for a short while. Many cancer patients end up on Medicare before their treatment ends because they are dropped by their insurance companies.

Drug addiction can result in death, but  drug rehab will result in the patient’s introduction to a life of recovery. As soon as the patient finishes the detox process, he goes through 28 days of counseling and therapy. It’s an intensive therapy designed to help the individual get back on his feet. After the therapy is done, he may go to a halfway house. As to why insurance companies won’t cover drug rehab, it is a matter of cost. It is not that they want more drug addicts on the street. It’s just expensive to treat the condition.

Speak with one of our admissions counselors today 855-782-1009

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When Your Son or Daughter Won’t Go To Rehab, Maybe a Marchman Act Can Help

Being a parent comes with many worries, and one of the greatest ones is not being able to help a son or daughter. You are seeing this fear come to life because your loved one failed to recognize the importance of going to a drug rehab center.

Why is Your Loved One Refusing Help?

Addiction is a major problem and one that changes a person’s mental structure. The addictive drug feeds the brain active ingredients that flood the reward system in the mind.

This restructures the amygdala so that it now expects specific stimuli it only gets from drugs. This is part of what makes addiction hard to overcome. Some addictions get so severe that things like reason or self-control are no longer driving forces within the mind. The reason your child does not want to go to rehab may actually be a side-effect to the addiction.

How the Marchman Act can Help

The Marchman Act is one way you can help your child. You can petition for this act so that professionals can take control of the situation. This act can be used to voluntarily admit oneself into a rehab, but it can be used to admit someone who is not willing to go into rehab.

You can talk to the professionals at the drug rehab you are considering about what to expect, but remember that your case has to qualify in order to use the Marchman Act in your kid’s favor. Do not worry about your kid not understanding the importance of rehab. The lack of control is usually enough to qualify.

The professionals at the rehab will likely administer psychological treatments and a detox program to help your kid overcome his or her addiction.

Your child will probably participate in group therapy, which gives him or her an opportunity to share experiences with others who have gone through similar problems. This therapy encourages openness and also provides your kid with a support system that is going to be helpful later on.

The professionals at this drug rehab are also going to give your loved one the tools needed to consistently fight addiction. Now, it should be noted that the Marchman Act is temporary, and your child will only be be kept against his or her will for a short period of time. This means it is important to continue to encourage him or her to voluntarily stay in the drug rehab, even after the power of the Marchman Act runs out.

Let us help you.  Call today 855-782-1009

Why Firefighters Have a Larger Risk of Being Addicted to Drugs

Drug abuse is unfortunately more common among firefighters than most other groups. The demanding and stressful nature of the job can lead to firefighters using drugs to cope, which quickly results in addiction. Fortunately, there are resources available to help with recovery.

Stress and Trauma

Firefighting is a dangerous and sometimes life-threatening job. It can also cause emotional trauma. Firefighters are usually the first to respond to accidents, disasters, or acts of violence. They see people injured and killed in horrible ways. In some situations, they do all they can, but they can’t save everybody.

Firefighters also see many people going through traumatic events. They comfort people whose homes have burned down, who have been in serious car accidents, or whose family members have been injured or even killed. Seeing so many people physically and emotionally hurt can take a huge tool on a firefighter’s mental health.

The irregular schedule and long hours away from home and family can also be stressful for firefighters. As a result of the stress and trauma of their job, they may turn to alcohol or drugs as a coping mechanism. Unfortunately, all types of drugs can be an issue for firefighters, but prescription drug abuse is especially common.

Firefighting and Prescription Drug Abuse

Firefighters have a physically demanding job, and they may be prescribed painkillers after an injury. While they’re helpful when prescribed, some firefighters continue to illegally use the drugs even after their injury has healed. The drugs can produce a feeling of euphoria, but they’re also very addictive.

It’s also common for firefighters to be prescribed tranquilizers like Xanax, Ativan, and Clonazepam to help with anxiety of PTSD. Like painkillers, these drugs can be extremely addictive.

Some firefighters abuse stimulants like Adderall, Ritalin, and illicit drugs. They work long shifts, and stimulants can help them stay awake, alert, and energetic. However, addiction to these drugs happens quickly.

How to Help

Common signs of drug addiction include loss of interest, withdrawing from friends or family, mood swings, and missing work. If you have a friend or family member who is a firefighter struggling with drug addiction, let them know that you’re willing to help. You shouldn’t accuse them of anything or pressure them to talk to you, but let them know that you can listen or help them look for resources for recovery.

Call us today 855-782-1009

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What To Do If Your Son or Daughter Wants To Leave Rehab Early

Few seasons in life are as difficult as the one in which your child admits he or she is an addict. It’s the first step on the road to recovery, but it’s not an easy one for them or for you. It’s up to you to support your child finding help to overcome addiction, and it’s made difficult when your child decides leaving a rehab program early is the right decision. If she discusses this with you, there are a few things you must do to handle this situation with grace.
 

Listen

The most important thing you’ll do during this entire conversation is listen. If she is ready to leave rehab early, ask why and then listen. Yelling, arguing, demanding a return, and showing your disappointment are all counterproductive. Sometimes the reason they might give is vague, but your job as a parent is to read between the lines.

Perhaps your daughter was hurt, abused, bullied, or made to feel inadequate. Perhaps she doesn’t care for authority. Perhaps she isn’t ready for rehab. There are numerous reasons your child might leave without your consent, and it’s up to you to hear what they are really telling you when they discuss why they want to leave.

 

Discuss Options

daughter rehab

Now that your adult daughter has decided to leave rehab, open up the conversation to discuss other options. What is the new plan for recovery? What is the next step your child is seeking for treatment? You might need to do some homework of your own to find therapists, another rehab facility, or a group meeting your child can attend. The most important thing here is to open up the conversation and remain calm.

 

Discuss the Pros and Cons

Sometimes she needs your parental advice, but not always in the way you imagine. Let her do the talking, but ask about the pros and cons of staying versus leaving rehab. What does your child have to gain? What does he have to lose? Let them answer the questions on their own, and let them see the situation from their own perspective.

Be supportive. If they wants to leave rehab on their own, there’s very little you can do about it as they are adults now. The best you can do is be there to provide support, a listening ear, and the love they need to deal with this.

We can help, call now 855-782-1009

Research Shows: Drug Addiction is Predictable You've heard the public service warnings, television commercials, education programs in schools: say no to drugs. Governments local and federal spend millions of dollars every year spouting frightening illicit drug figures and flashing disturbing images of drug addicts. Their message is that drug addition is real and that it could happen to you. And while drug addiction is very real and ruins hundreds of thousands of lives every year, everyone is not at equal risk. Are You in Danger of Drug Addiction or Not? The story we're told time and again is that even one time trying drugs may be enough to get you hooked on drugs. But consider this: about 1 in 3 adults will try using drugs in their lifetimes, yet at this moment only about 15 million people worldwide suffer from drug abuse. Since the world population is roughly 7 billion, that means that only about 0.2% of the world population struggles with addiction. 

Knowing the Danger Zones
One of the largest forces that seems to factor into drug addiction is geographic location. There are countries where illicit drug use is almost nonexistent such as China and Argentina, then there's Afghanistan, leading the world, where 29 of every 100,000 dies of drug overdose. Some US cities have almost no trouble with drugs while Missoula, Montana suffers a 13.8% of households reporting illegal drug use in a 30-day period. Where You've Been and What You Know
Studies show that socio-economic factors also weigh heavily on determining the risk of addiction. The highest concentrations of drug addiction in the US are in low-income, urban areas. The lower the level of education achieved, the higher the rate of addiction. Also drug abuse stats rise with the history of prior incarceration, lower income levels, and smaller employment histories. 
Genetics: Getting Off On the Wrong Foot Science 2.0 reports that "In reality the likelihood of individuals without pre-existing vulnerabilities succumbing to long-term addiction is slim." One could say that drug addiction is addictive—in that it tends to spread in small communities and be passed on genetically.

Skipping a Semester in College to Go To Addiction Rehab and Get Sober

Young adults, including many college students, are experiencing higher addiction rates than ever. Although otherwise-successful students may be reluctant to give up college for a semester to get sober, it may be the wisest choice they can make to help protect their college career, before addiction causes their grades to plummet. There are several benefits to taking a semester off from college to enter rehab for addiction.

Maintain academic credibility

Research Shows: Drug Addiction is Predictable You've heard the public service warnings, television commercials, education programs in schools: say no to drugs. Governments local and federal spend millions of dollars every year spouting frightening illicit drug figures and flashing disturbing images of drug addicts. Their message is that drug addition is real and that it could happen to you. And while drug addiction is very real and ruins hundreds of thousands of lives every year, everyone is not at equal risk. Are You in Danger of Drug Addiction or Not? The story we're told time and again is that even one time trying drugs may be enough to get you hooked on drugs. But consider this: about 1 in 3 adults will try using drugs in their lifetimes, yet at this moment only about 15 million people worldwide suffer from drug abuse. Since the world population is roughly 7 billion, that means that only about 0.2% of the world population struggles with addiction. 

Knowing the Danger Zones
One of the largest forces that seems to factor into drug addiction is geographic location. There are countries where illicit drug use is almost nonexistent such as China and Argentina, then there's Afghanistan, leading the world, where 29 of every 100,000 dies of drug overdose. Some US cities have almost no trouble with drugs while Missoula, Montana suffers a 13.8% of households reporting illegal drug use in a 30-day period. Where You've Been and What You Know
Studies show that socio-economic factors also weigh heavily on determining the risk of addiction. The highest concentrations of drug addiction in the US are in low-income, urban areas. The lower the level of education achieved, the higher the rate of addiction. Also drug abuse stats rise with the history of prior incarceration, lower income levels, and smaller employment histories. 
Genetics: Getting Off On the Wrong Foot Science 2.0 reports that "In reality the likelihood of individuals without pre-existing vulnerabilities succumbing to long-term addiction is slim." One could say that drug addiction is addictive—in that it tends to spread in small communities and be passed on genetically.When an addiction develops, it is best not to wait until the person starts to fail in important areas of life, typically including school, jobs, and relationships. Entering rehab when signs of addiction begin to manifest can help the substance abuser get prompt intervention and assistance to overcome the addiction and resume normal activities. A student with an acceptable grade point average and clean legal record can maintain a professional image by going to rehab before problems develop.

 

Prevent ensuing problems

Addiction often leads to personal struggles in key areas. Studies are among the first areas of life to be affected. Students who struggle with addiction may stop attending classes or be unable to perform effectively in class. Assignments might be late or not be turned in at all. Other students and instructors begin to notice abnormal behavior, some of which may result in the student being officially reprimanded for using alcohol or drugs on campus. At the first sign of an addiction issue, students are wise to seek evaluation and enter rehab, if warranted.

 

Prepare for a successful future

Addressing addiction and successfully completing rehab helps a student to build effective decision-making and self-governance skills that will be needed in college and for a career. Beating an addiction can instill confidence and courage to help students face other life issues that may appear later. Working through recovery with the help of a rehab program allows a student to see that support organizations are available to guide them through trials and troubles. Many people who overcome an addiction want to give back to society by helping others who are also struggling with addiction. Gratitude and reciprocity are valuable attributes for every stage of life.

Although a student may be reluctant to stop attending college to enter rehab, recovery is a necessary component for ultimate college success. Skipping a college term to address this health concern can pave the way for subsequent academic success and set a positive example for others.

We can help, call us today 855-782-1009

Does Your Family Have a History of Addiction?

Parents of drug or alcohol dependent adult children know the heartache of problematic habits better than anyone. The long and often all too familiar stories, events, and downturns impact the entire family and overthrow any sense of normalcy. The devastating history of addiction often seems to have no end, but there is hope for even families with long term histories of addiction. Read on for some suggestions.

Always Offer Love

Families do well to continue to provide love for their drug or alcohol addicted adult children, However, this love does not need to equate to enabling behavior. Addicts sometimes hurt loved ones by word or deed, or push them away when they need them most. However, love, hope, and belief always shine as important beacons in the darkness, and should not be underestimated. Balancing life and caring for yourself as a parent of an adult addict child is not easy, but there are support groups where parents and family members in similar situations can connect. These types of groups acknowledge healthy relationship boundaries as well as aspects of addiction and recovery. It can be a great relief to commune with other family members in the same situation and to encourage healthy affirmations and reach for the light at the end of the tunnel together.

Research Options

Often the unconditional love from parents is not enough in itself to beat addiction once and for all. The adult child must want to make a permanent change and it is hard to tell what will work for your loved one. There are many options worth exploring, and there are often reviews and qualifications for each. Research the qualified sobriety, treatment, and recovery centers in your area, or in an area of the country your child is willing to travel to. Gauge your adult child’s desire to recover, and understand that even if an addict relapses initially, a future recovery attempt might work. Decide if a faith based program is right for your loved one and think outside the box about what types of distractions or support systems might help alleviate the anxiety and discomfort associated with stepping away from the long time dependency on the drug of choice.

Immerse yourself and your loved one in both hope and reality. Read stories about addicts who overcame the disease once and for all. Read and learn about addiction in order to separate emotions about the addiction from the other components of your addicted loved one and your feelings for him or her. Take care of yourself and acknowledge that while the journey is often long and complicated, there is a possibility of true recovery and healing for everyone.

Call us for help today 855-782-1009

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Is It Normal To Gain Weight After Going To Drug Treatment?

People who have been through substance abuse treatment often talk about the weight gain afterward. Is this just a myth, though, or is there some truth to it? Read on to learn more about the side effects of addiction treatment and how to combat them.

Medications That Treat Substance Abuse

beat food addiction carbs rehabThere are many medications that treat substance abuse, depending on your specific addiction. For example, people struggling with opioid addiction may be prescribed Methadone to help ease withdrawal symptoms and suppress cravings. Doctors help people who are struggling with alcohol abuse by prescribing medications like Naltrexone.

Sometimes addiction is treated with antidepressants — especially if there is a co-occurring mental health condition.

Side Effects of Substance Abuse Recovery

Each of these medications’ side effects include weight gain. Methadone, for example, affects your body’s metabolism, slowing down how you process food. Methadone also sometimes causes edema — or water retention — in the body, resulting in bloating and “water weight” gain.

Sometimes people recovering from substance abuse subdue their cravings by consuming food or sugar, resulting in weight gain. While there are some foods that can help decrease alcohol cravings, it is possible to swap one addiction for another. Eating can affect your body’s dopamine and serotonin levels, making you feel good. Many people who quit smoking, for example, find themselves overeating instead of smoking.

Coping with Addiction Treatment Side Effects

There are many things you can to do fight weight gain after addiction treatment. Before beginning any exercise or diet, make sure to talk with your doctor. Your doctor may also have other suggestions or lower the dosage of any medications that may be causing weight gain. Also, many patients find that they lose the weight they gained from medication after they taper off.

Here are a few things you can do to lose weight:

Eat healthy food. Exercise frequently. Drink plenty of water.

  • Eat healthy food. Incorporate fruits and vegetables into your diet, and eat smaller, more frequent meals to boost your metabolism.
  • Exercise frequently. Not only is exercise a great way to get in shape, but it may also help you fight cravings.
  • Drink plenty of water. Traditional advice has been to drink eight 8 oz glasses of water per day, but the right amount for you may depend on many factors.

There are many reasons why you might gain weight after drug treatment. With your doctor’s help and support from friends and family, you can overcome substance abuse and its effects on your body, and live a healthy, fulfilling life.

Call us to get started on your recovery today 855-782-1009

What Does Going To Drug Rehab Mean For Someone Who Is a Police Officer?

Tired young doctor

The nation’s law enforcement are sadly facing an epidemic of substance abuse issues. A job in law enforcement is one of the most stressful jobs around, and the officers are more exposed to different types of substances almost each day. The stress of their jobs takes a toll on their bodies and minds, and they often turn to drugs to numb themselves. This article will go over what going to rehab means for law enforcement officers.

Why is Getting an Officer Help More Difficult than a Civilian?

A police officer has lots of pride, and they usually feel a great deal of shame once they realize they have a problem. They also typically need help with more issues than just the substance abuse, and this requires specialized centers. Issues that many law enforcement officers have difficulty with along with the substance abuse are:Along with all of this, there is the fear that their jobs are on the line. They fear that their colleagues will look at them differently if they find out there is an addiction.

  • Anger Management
  • Coping and Dealing with Violence
  • PTSD Therapies
  • Resolving Guilt

How do You Get a Law Enforcement Officer into Rehab?

The first step is finding a rehab facility that suits each officer’s individual needs. You can contact local rehab facilities and talk to their staff. If you’re not sure of which facilities are in your area, you can call an addiction hotline, and they can point you in the correct direction. They may even have information on specific facilities that are designed for EMTs, law enforcement, military personnel, and other jobs with a high-stress factor.

The second thing that has to happen is the officer has to talk to their supervisor and let them know what is going on. They should also tell them what they’re planning on doing to resolve their substance abuse issue.

The third thing that has to happen is the officer should do is build a support network. They should tell trusted family, friends, and work colleagues about their crisis. A strong support system will be invaluable to their recovery process. As soon as the officer realizes that having a problem and getting help won’t make anyone look at them differently, the weight will lift off their shoulders.

If may seem terrifying to ask for the help you need, but the first step to getting treatment is asking for help and recognizing you have a problem. If you trust yourself, get into the facility that is best designed to help you, and rely on your support network, you can beat your addiction. You will be able to come back stronger than you were and live a healthy life.

Call us about our First Responders Program today 855-782-1009